Animal Resource Exercise 

Pets and Service Animals · Livestock · Captive Wildlife · Lab Animals

Exercise Overview

Multi-Jurisdictional Animal Coordination Exercise (MARCE) 2017 was a Homeland Security Exercise and Evaluation Program (HSEEP) functional exercise and took place the week of July 11-14, 2017. Using virtual sandbox environments, players collaborated to exercise resource coordination during a major natural disaster affecting animals. This exercise focused on nationwide coordination to test state Emergency Operations Center's (EOCs) ability to request out-of-state, federal, and non-governmental organization (NGO) resources in response to a disaster affecting animals. In addition, participating states exercised their ability to offer support for another state's animal resource request(s). 

Exercise Objectives

  • Participate in a regional conference call
  • Demonstrate ability to accurately request federal, out-of-state, and NGO assistance 
  • Develop Mission Ready Packages
  • Respond to EMAC requests with appropriate and accurate information

Exercise Structure

Participating states played virtually from their state Emergency Operations Center (EOC) or equivalent. States were assigned to play for two consecutive days: July 11-12 or 13-14. States prepared by participating in pre-exercise trainings.

Team Composition

Required Participants

Players:

    • State animal emergency operations personnel responsible for pets and service animals, livestock, captive wildlife, laboratory animals
    • State emergency management personnel with authority for Emergency Management Assistance Compacts and Resource Request Forms

Evaluator/Controller (Non-Player):

    • State exercise/training officer (or individual with extensive exercise experience)

Optional Participants

  • State veterinarian/animal health official
  • State finance/logistics officer
  • Other applicable stakeholders
  • Observers

 


This exercise made possible through Cooperative Agreement No. 16-6100-0109-CA between
United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) 
and the University of Kentucky.